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Plea from children: PM, please save kids on Nauru

A group of Australian children has called on the Prime Minister to release children being held on Nauru.

"The only thing these kids did wrong is that they escaped war and tyranny": a new video calls on Australia's Prime Minister to release children from Nauru.

By Emma Halgren

October 14 2018A group of Australian children has called on Prime Minister Scott Morrison to release children from detention on Nauru and bring them to Australia. 

In a video launched today, the children plead with Mr Morrison to save the children being held on Nauru, saying: “We’re using children as decoys to show other refugees what will happen to them if they try to escape to Australia.”

Many of the children featured in the video have been supporting children on Nauru for a number of years, sending letters and presents to them to try to brighten their lives.

“Doctors who are helping them said their detention amounts to a form of torture. We’re torturing kids. Australia is doing this to little kids like me,” say the children in the video.

The video is part of the #KidsOffNauru campaign. A coalition of more than 230 humanitarian, refugee, church and human rights organisations is calling on the Australian Government to remove all asylum seeker children from Nauru by Universal Children’s Day, 20 November.

A number of Anglican groups are part of the coalition, including St Paul’s Cathedral, the Anglican Diocese of Sydney, Mothers’ Union Australia, and several individual churches from across Australia.

A spokesperson said the video had been sent to the Prime Minister 10 days ago, along with a request that he to meet with the children featured in it to explain why Australia is persecuting innocent children. The Prime Minister has not responded to this request.

Bishop Philip Huggins, president of the National Council of Churches in Australia, and filmmaker Richard Keddie, whose credits include Ride Like A Girl, Hawke, Little Fish and Oddball, have helped the children express their fears on film.