News Stand

Newsstand 14 - 20 May

A Melbourne Anglican shares her understanding of volunteering as Christian service; faith institutions call for a just and green economic recovery from the pandemic; and a tribute to nurses.

May 20 2020 


The May edition of The Melbourne Anglican (TMA) is now available in various formats for reading online and printing. Please click here. The Prayer Diary has not been included within the pages of TMA this month, but can be found here.

 

Cathedral gift shop survives by finding new market
The St Paul’s Cathedral gift shop has moved online in response to the closure of the Cathedral due to the coronavirus pandemic.

  

What does it take to be a bushfire volunteer?
Tammy Shepherd, a member of the St Hilary’s Network, says she feels “personally called” to volunteer where she can. Ellaine Downie, who worships with Tammy, spoke with her in February about her volunteering experiences, the most recent of which was relief work in bushfire-devastated East Gippsland. “I was interested that she would volunteer for the dirty work of bushfire clean-up, which many would see as a ‘menial’ task,” says Ellaine. “Yet her commitment to volunteering reveals a philosophy and understanding of volunteering as Christian service that I find quite inspiring.”

 

A time of lament, and a time of awakening
Former TMA editor Roland Ashby reflects on how walking in nature is helping many people to lift their spirits during the COVID-19 pandemic, and hopes that once the current crisis is over, people will take urgent steps to save the natural world that they love.

 

Getting to know the stranger: what theology can teach us
Trinity College Theological School’s Dr Scott Kirkland shares his thoughts on why theology is about refusing mastery of the world, and what embracing this concept can teach us. 

 

National Youth Employment Body aims to build workforce skills
Treasury expects the jobless rate will hit a staggering 10 per cent in the wake of the economic shutdown, but even before the coronavirus pandemic, youth unemployment was higher than that. The Brotherhood of St Laurence has turned its mind to the challenge of building workforce skills, working in partnership with the government and industry to develop a National Youth Employment Body. Executive director Conny Lenneberg and Quin Scalzo, founder of Scalzo Food Industries and chair of a Brotherhood of St Laurence committee finding jobs for disadvantaged young people in Melbourne, spoke with Radio National Breakfast’s Fran Kelly last week.

 

What churches really think about opening up
Pastors who ignore coronavirus restrictions grab headlines. But most are being very careful about worship during the pandemic, writes Alan Cross, a Southern Baptist pastor, in The New York Times.

 

Faith institutions call for divesting from fossil fuels
As major challenges for the global economy are predicted in the wake of the coronavirus pandemic, a diverse group of faith institutions is putting the call for a just economic recovery into practice.

 

Old or young: we all have equal value
“I’ve been left wondering at the amount of oxygen being given to a particular branch of ‘pandemic analysis’, one that sees cost-benefit analysis taking centre stage, with all the disturbing suggestions that follow,” writes Dr Daniel Fleming, Group Manager: Ethics and Formation for St Vincent's Health Australia, in Eureka Street.

 

Ode to nurses
200 years on from the birth of Florence Nightingale, in the International Year of the Nurse and Midwife, in the midst of coronavirus … the Centre for Public Christianity’s Life & Faith series offers a celebration of nurses and nursing, in their own words, and in five parts: The Call, Pandemic, Death, Humans, Salute.

 

A song in your heart shouldn’t lead to an infection in your lungs: reasons to get with online choirs
Live ensemble singing presents a higher health risk for coronavirus for a number of reasons, so safe singing may require larger spaces and protocols than are possible in practice under the current restrictions. Many around the world have turned to online choirs to keep up the habit safely.